Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses
Unlocking History

Welcome

Unlock History at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses

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Welcome to Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses

Opened as a museum in 1971, Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses (HGGHH) preserves the rich architectural and cultural history of the French Quarter throughout the 19th century and into the 20th century.  Overseen by The Woman’s Exchange and an Executive Director, HGGHH comprises two National Historic Landmark houses and a collection of over 4,000 paintings, decorative arts objects, and objects of material culture.  

Hermann-Grima Historic House has one of the largest collections of portraits by famed 19th-century portraitist Jean Joseph Vaudechamp continuously on display in the state as well as several works by Vaudechamp’s younger contemporary Jacques Amans, and several other works by lesser known 19th-century portraitists and landscape artists.  Gallier Historic House is a fascinating example of 19th-century French Quarter townhouse living, combined with unique architectural innovations from James Gallier Jr.

We offer a wide variety of programming for both youth and adults, from daily guided tours of both historic houses to innovative summer camps, monthly lectures, field trips, and much more.  

Join us as we continue to unlock history and explore the past every day at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses.

 
 

 

Join us as we Unlock History Every Day!

 

 

Mission

The Hermann-Grima+Gallier Historic Houses maintains and provides access to two historic houses in the French Quarter both constructed in the early to mid 19th century.  Overall the houses combined are the stewards of over 3000 paintings, items of decorative arts, furniture, and other artifacts that were either original to the houses or are best examples of those items representative of the period.

The mission of the Hermann-Grima+Gallier Historic Houses is to preserve and present the architecture and history of New Orleans from the 19th-century construction of the houses, through the mid twentieth century. We aim to be an example of best practices and stewardship both in architectural preservation and in inclusive education. We build invigorating partnerships both in the community and nationally, to increase the reach of the houses and their histories contributing to a larger conversation.  The educational programming of the Hermann-Grima+Gallier Historic Houses, offered to both local community members, and out of town visitors, helps ensure that an accurate and inclusive history of the Houses is well communicated, adding to the overall historical fabric of New Orleans.  To this effect we continually work to expand our interpretation of both houses, including the lives of the enslaved peoples, who both lived and worked in the houses. Our engaging programming, for both youth and adults, inspires an interest in preservation for the future.

How We Became HGGHH

The Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses maintains and provides access to two historic houses in the French Quarter both constructed in the early to mid 19th century.  Overall the houses combined are stewards of over 3000 paintings, decorative arts, furniture, and other artifacts, that were either original to the houses, or are representative of the period.

Hermann-Grima Historic House was built for Samuel Hermann by William Brand in 1831.  He resided here with his family until 1844, when he was forced to sell it to Felix Grima, a local judge and notary, due to financial hardship.  The Grima family occupied the House until 1921, when it was sold to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; they sold the property to the Christian Woman’s Exchange in 1923.  The Christian Woman’s Exchange, which became The Woman’s Exchange in 1999, ran the Hermann-Grima House as a boarding house for unchaperoned working women from 1924 until 1975, shifting the organization’s mission from charity to preservation and education.  In the mid 1960s, the Christian Woman’s Exchange began the restoration of Hermann-Grima House to its original 19th-century grandeur. The courtyard and kitchen were the first areas of the complex to be opened to the public. The open-hearth cooking program began after kitchen renovations, begun in 1972, were completed. The hall and parlor were decorated and furnished with help from The National Society of The Colonial Dames in the State of Louisiana, ensuring that the entire complex was transformed into a museum focused on the interpretation of life in New Orleans from 1830 to 1860. 

Construction of Gallier House began in 1857, to be the home of renowned architect James Gallier, Jr. and his family.  In the mid 1960s it was briefly the home of the Freeman family, who, when they decided to move, restored the house to its original 19th-century glamour, using Gallier Jr.’s own plans and original house inventory.  At the completion of this restoration Gallier House was turned over to the Tulane School of Architecture.  In 1996, The Christian Woman’s Exchange, in order to expand its education and preservation mission, acquired Gallier Historic House from Tulane University.

Today, the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses operate under the direction of The Woman’s Exchange Board of Managers and an Executive Director.  The Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses are two of the most recognized architectural gems from 19th-century New Orleans.  Both houses are AAM accredited historic house museums and both are designated National Historic Landmarks.  

The mission of the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses is to preserve and present the architecture and history of New Orleans from the 19th-century construction of the houses, through the mid twentieth century. They are an example of best practices and stewardship both in architectural preservation and in inclusive education. The educational programming of the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses, offered to both local community members and out of town visitors, ensures that an accurate and inclusive history of the Houses is well communicated and adds to the historical fabric of New Orleans.  To this effect we continually work to expand our interpretation of both houses, including the lives of the enslaved peoples, who both lived and worked in the houses. Our engaging programming, for both youth and adults, inspires an interest in preservation for the future.

Hermann-Grima House

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Hermann-Grima Historic House is a microcosm of New Orleans history and includes many significant features from its almost 200 years. This restored French Quarter home built in 1831, includes a Federalist architectural façade, original operating open-hearth kitchen, urban slave quarters, and stunning courtyard. In addition, the property’s 19th-century carriage house is home to the The Exchange Shop, originally founded in the 1880’s by The Woman’s Exchange and important to women’s history in New Orleans. 

HOURS

Open Daily: 10am – 4pm

TOUR TIMES

Thursday – Tuesday: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 3pm (and by appointment). No Wednesday tours except by appointment.

Gallier House

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Built in 1861, by local architect James Gallier, Jr. as his private family residence, this Victorian French Quarter townhouse exemplifies architectural features that are not only unique to New Orleans, but also innovative and advanced for the period. Marked by an iconic Paris Green gate, the Royal street home includes an ornate interior décor, running hot and cold water, experimental skylight, intact attached slave quarters, and classic courtyard.

HOURS

Thursday - Tuesday: 10am - 4pm

TOUR TIMES

Thursday – Tuesday 
10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm
(and by appointment)