Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses
Unlocking History

Events

Events

Museum Month (All of August)
Aug
1
10:00 AM10:00

Museum Month (All of August)

New Orleans MUSEUM MONTH is a collaboration between museums of all sizes across the greater New Orleans area. It offers museum members the opportunity to visit all participating institutions, FREE OF CHARGE, using their current membership throughout the month of August.

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Summer Courtyard Camp
Aug
5
to Aug 9

Summer Courtyard Camp

  • 820 Saint Louis Street New Orleans, LA, 70112 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Explore 19thcentury life in New Orleans through crafts, games, and project-based learning at the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses. Campers ages 7 to 12 garner a better understanding of the past during our August 5th through 9th camp by exploring two historic houses in the French Quarter, cooking over an open-hearth, making 19th century home remedies, and writing and performing their own scripts set in post-bellum New Orleans. $350 for nonmembers and $300 for Family level museum members. Contact haleyhs@hgghh.org for more information.

Time: 9am – 3pm each day

Ticket Price: $300/child for HGGHH Family Level Members; $350/child for nonmembers

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Dirty Linen Night
Aug
10
6:00 PM18:00

Dirty Linen Night

Join us at Gallier Historic House for the 19th annual Dirty Linen Night! Stop by our historic courtyard to take in the views while enjoying refreshments. Make sure to get your tickets to the event so you can peruse the Royal Street galleries, shops, and music along the way. It’s one of the best nights in the French Quarter!

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August Gallier Gathering: A Changeling in their Laps: Critical Cosmopolitanism and the Intellectual Work of Alain Locke
Aug
14
5:30 PM17:30

August Gallier Gathering: A Changeling in their Laps: Critical Cosmopolitanism and the Intellectual Work of Alain Locke

Well known as one of the cultural leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, Alain Locke developed a career that is a montage of experiences. Dr. Olidge will discuss Alain Locke’s life and events which contributed to his intellectual perspective on cosmopolitanism as demonstrated in his philosophical and educational thought.

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July Gallier Gathering: Louisiana Swamp Rats: Our Love/Hate Relationship with Nutria
Jul
10
6:00 PM18:00

July Gallier Gathering: Louisiana Swamp Rats: Our Love/Hate Relationship with Nutria

  • 1128 Royal Street New Orleans, LA, 70116 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for an educational and entertaining evening with Cree McCree as she addresses South Louisiana's complex relationship with the infamous nutria for most of the 20th-century.

About the Speaker:
The minute she set foot in New Orleans, during her first Jazz Fest visit in 1988, Cree knew the city would eventually become her home. In 2001, she finally made the move from New York City, where she was a writer and editor for many national magazines. But Cree’s talents paint her more as a native than a transplant. The author of Flea Market America: The Complete Guide to Flea Enterprise, Cree first made a name for herself locally as a thrift-shop fashionista, founding a series of flea markets and costume bazaars and creating her own unique “Cree-ations” for Mardi Gras and Halloween.
As an assemblage artist with an eye for the potential in discards, Cree also found value in recycling the by-products of the Coastwide Nutria Control Program, which pays trappers and hunters $5 a tail for killing the marsh-munching invasive species. In 2010, she founded Righteous Fur to turn the fur harvested from Louisiana “swamp rats” into stylish contemporary clothing, and also created an elegant jewelry line made from nutria teeth. Working with a collective of local designers, Cree staged a series of Righteous Fur fashion shows in New Orleans, Lafayette and New York City, which brought attention to Louisiana’s fragile wetlands from the New York Times, NPR, the BBC and other major press. Righteous Fur’s “fashion with a conscience” is also featured in Rodents of Unusual Size, an award-winning documentary about Louisiana’s nutria problem, which recently aired on PBS. Though it closed up shop in 2017, when the nonprofit org lost both its funding and its primary pelt supplier, Righteous Fur served a vital role in raising awareness of the role nutria plays as an invasive species laying waste to Louisiana’s precious wetlands.
Cree currently manages Piety Market In Exile at the New Orleans Healing Center, an art and flea market she founded as Piety Street Market in 2011, and organizes two long-running costume sales featuring top local designers every Halloween and Mardi Gras. She also continues to write for a wide range of local and national outlets, and is working on a memoir.

Ticket Price: $10 in advance; $12 at the door, $10 Museum members.

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June Gallier Gathering: 1868 St. Bernard Parish Massacre: Blood in the Cane Fields
Jun
12
6:00 PM18:00

June Gallier Gathering: 1868 St. Bernard Parish Massacre: Blood in the Cane Fields

  • 1128 Royal Street New Orleans, LA, 70116 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for a special evening with local author and educator Chris Dier as he discusses his book The 1868 St. Bernard Parish Massacre: Blood in the Cane Fields. He will give an overview of relevant St. Bernard Parish history, trace the horrific events that surrounded the presidential election of 1868, and explore its causes and aftermath.

“Days before the tumultuous presidential election of 1868, St. Bernard Parish descended into chaos. As African American men gained the right to vote, white Democrats of the parish feared losing their majority. Armed groups mobilized to suppress these recently emancipated voters in the hopes of regaining a way of life turned upside down by the Civil War and Reconstruction. Freedpeople were dragged from their homes and murdered in cold blood. Many fled to the cane fields to hide from their attackers. The reported number of those killed varies from 35 to 135. The tragedy was hidden, but implications reverberated throughout the South and lingered for generations. Author and historian Chris Dier reveals the horrifying true story behind the St. Bernard Parish Massacre.”

About the Speaker:
Dier is currently a history teacher at Chalmette High School in his hometown of St. Bernard Parish. He graduated from East Texas Baptist University with a bachelor's degree in history. Dier also holds two education-related master's degrees from the University of New Orleans.

Ticket Price: $10 advance: $12 door

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May Gallier Gathering: Pierre Becnel’s Transformation of Evergreen Plantation
May
8
6:00 PM18:00

May Gallier Gathering: Pierre Becnel’s Transformation of Evergreen Plantation

  • 1128 Royal Street New Orleans, LA, 70116 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

"Searching for Belonging and Safety: Pierre Becnel’s Transformation of Evergreen Plantation in the 1830s"

English words with a French accent. American style with a French flair. Greek Revival façade with Creole foundation. Over the course of the antebellum era, many Franco-white Louisianans found themselves modifying their language, fashion, and architecture to better ingratiate themselves with the increasingly powerful Anglo-Americans. But they would not concede their culture easily or totally, rather adapting their beliefs and practices as they attempted to maintain their social and political power. Particularly in New Orleans and its adjacent parishes—including St. John the Baptist Parish west of the city—Creoles walked the line between their French heritage and their new American identity. One thing that both had in common, though, was the institution of slavery. Whether French or American (or something in between), to own enslaved laborers was to have economic and social power in antebellum Louisiana.

About the Speaker:
Whitney Nell Stewart is assistant professor of Historical Studies and affiliate of the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at the University of Texas at Dallas. Her research focuses on the intersection of race and material culture in the nineteenth-century United States. Her current book manuscript, tentatively titled “The Home that Slavery Made: How Plantation Slavery Racialized the American Home,” examines how and why enslavers and enslaved people utilized the plantation’s built environment and domestic material culture to build home within the institution of slavery. This coming year, she will serve as a National Endowment for the Humanities Long-Term Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society. Stewart’s work has also been supported by the Smithsonian, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, the Huntington Library, and the Winterthur Museum, among others. She is the author of the Journal of Social History article “Fashioning Frenchness: Gens de Couleur Libres and the Cultural Struggle for Power in Antebellum New Orleans,” which recently won the Glenn R. Conrad Prize in best published article on Louisiana history from the Louisiana Historical Association. Additionally, she is co-editor of Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations (University of Georgia Press, 2018). Stewart has served as curatorial fellow at various institutions, including the Bayou Bend Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and The Henry Ford, as well as a field research fellow with the Classical Institute of the South.

Ticket Price: $10 advance; $12 door; $10 Museum members

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